Advice from Don Corleone, “Crash” Davis and Others for Todays MediaPros

The lessons in life are learned in many ways. As children we learn from our parents. A solid education teaches us to accept the challenge of learning on our own. But through it all there is one constant, one source as reliable as Don Corleone in The Godfather promising, “I’m going to make him an offer he can’t refuse.” I refer of course to the movies, a source of wisdom for the ages.


Lessons in life are learned in many ways

As media producers the movies have a lot to teach us about how to create effective programs. Some of the best lessons I’ve learned about this business crystalized in my mind hearing movie dialogue. Here is some of what I’ve learned.

Beginning, Middle, End: “If you’re going to become true dodgeballers, then you’ve got to learn the Five D’s of dodgeball: Dodge, Duck, Dip, Dive and Dodge!” DodgeBall: A True Underdog Story – From this small classic art film, dodgeball legend and Coach of the Average Joe’s, Patches O’Houlihan, (Rip Torn) offers great advice. Programs need a beginning (Dodge), a middle (Duck, Dip, Dive), and an ending (Dodge). The beginning and end are usually the easy parts. Avoid the flying wrenches and budget time for the hard work of constructing the middle.

Trust Your Instincts: “You just got lesson number one: don’t think; it can only hurt the ball club.” Bull Durham – When veteran minor league catcher “Crash” Davis (Kevin Costner) gives hotshot rookie pitcher Ebby “Nuke” LaLoosh (Tim Robbins) this advice, he should listen. “Crash” has seen it all, done it all, including life in “The Show.” As media producers we bring our own experiences to every project. Trust your instincts and build upon what you believe. “Crash” believes in, “the hanging curve, high fiber, good scotch… that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone… and there should be a constitutional amendment outlawing Astroturf and the designated hitter.” What do you believe in?

Own the Project: “We can do that; we don’t even have to have a reason.” Caddyshack – When golf course maintenance is entrusted to Carl Spackler, (Bill Murray) life at the upscale Bushwood Country Club is never the same. In reviewing a client’s messaging needs, what production element inspires your creativity? It could be an idea of how to creatively frame the message. An off-beat narrative style might fit, or contracting a composer for an original score might work. Like gophers on a golf course, ideas pop up constantly. Find something about a project that can get you excited. Than do it. Why, because you can. Ty Webb (Chevy Chase) the club’s resident Zen ace golfer offers this bit of timeless advice, “There’s a force in the universe that makes things happen. And all you have to do is get in touch with it, stop thinking, let things happen, and be the ball.”

Take Creative Risks: “Greatness courts failure.” Tin Cup – Roy McAvoy, (Kevin Costner) former golf prodigy turned driving range pro sees life differently from most people. Never afraid to take a risk, to put it all on line, Tin Cup believes that “When a defining moment comes along you define the moment or the moment defines you.” As media producers there are times to lay up and times to go for it. After losing his chance to win the U.S. Open Tournament by recording a 12 on the last hole, his girlfriend assures him, “Five years from now nobody will remember who won or lost, but they’re gonna remember your 12!” When the project is right, and maybe sometimes when it isn’t, just go for it!

Go with Your Strengths: “Forget about the curve ball Ricky, give him the heater.” Major League – With the game on the line Indian’s Coach Lou Brown (James Gammon) implores Ricky “Wild Thing” Vaughn (Charlie Sheen) to go with his strength. As a media producer you need to know your own strengths. There are projects to push the boundaries and stretch creatively. Then there are those projects that need to be done to keep the lights on and the bills paid. As team catcher Jake Taylor (Tom Berenger) tells prima donna third baseman Roger Dorn, (Corbin Bernsen) “Ya know Dorn, I liked you so much better when you were just a ballplayer. If you wanna be an interior decorator now that’s none of my business. But some of us still need this team.” Remember, the media business is a business, first and foremost. When bills need to be paid, do what you do best.

Share Success: “I did it all, I listened to the voices, I did what they told me, and not once did I ask what’s in it for me!” Field of Dreams – A client comes to you with their project and you produce it. What did you produce? You produced their project. Ray Kinsella (Kevin Costner) learned this lesson and shared all that he had. Sometimes we’re fortunate and can initiate our own work, but more often than not work comes from paying clients. Archibald “Moonlight” Graham (Burt Lancaster) may never had a turn at bat, but discovered his true calling. Much as you have a job to do, so does the client. Production, like baseball, is a team sport. Hold onto your values, never sell the farm, share in the success… and they will come.


Production, like baseball is a team sport

What inspires you? To be successful as a media producer, or in any avenue of life, find what motivates you and pursue it. As communication professionals we’re fortunate to work in a field that opens doors to opportunity for expression. Every project is an opportunity to find ways to overcome obstacles and help others deliver their message. We use equipment people in other professions envy. So make it fun and never, never refuse The Don.

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